Painter Charles Wallis & The World of the Empath

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The World of the Empath exhibition open until Feb 16th at Cultivate 7Twelve!

 

 

 

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A time for change … the art of Milton Bowens.

Milton Bowens totally read my blog and sent me a really cool message through my uncle, so awesome!

Cultivate

New Years is a great time to think about change. It’s a time to remember the good and to allow yourself to heal from the bad. It’s an opportunity to reflect on your life and, for better or worse, who you’re allowing yourself to become. So let’s ponder a relevant set of questions ….

Have you ever seen a piece of visual art or heard a piece of music that has changed your life? If so, what was it? And how did it change you? It can be a work of art, a play, a poem or a song.

Go!

I’ll kick of the discussion with a story from my own life.

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It was the year 1998 and I was 18 years old. (Yikes! That totally tells you how old I am, heh-heh.) I got my first part-time job with my Uncle Corey at his photography studio in California. My…

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A time for change … the art of Milton Bowens.

New Years is a great time to think about change. It’s a time to remember the good and to allow yourself to heal from the bad. It’s an opportunity to reflect on your life and, for better or worse, who you’re allowing yourself to become. So let’s ponder a relevant set of questions ….

Have you ever seen a piece of visual art or heard a piece of music that has changed your life? If so, what was it? And how did it change you? It can be a work of art, a play, a poem or a song.

Go!

I’ll kick of the discussion with a story from my own life.

 

 

Duke_B.B.B.-295x300

It was the year 1998 and I was 18 years old. (Yikes! That totally tells you how old I am, heh-heh.) I got my first part-time job with my Uncle Corey at his photography studio in California. My job was pretty simple: I was to weed out the undesirable photo proofs from photo sessions and then number those that passed muster. I loved working with my uncle. It was quiet and comfortable, and we basically chatted and listened to music for a few hours a week. It was the perfect first job.

One day after school I headed over to the studio for my usual shift. My uncle meet me at he door. He smiled brightly and said, “I have something really cool to show you and I think you’ll like it.” The first thing I noticed was that the studio was crowded with massive paintings. I was instantly interested. At this point art was already everything to me. I had already made up my mind by this point that I was going to be an artist professionally. But what I saw next let me know what kind of artist I wanted to be. The room was filled with dynamic post-pop, street-style collages that took my breath away. My uncle had been given the honor and task of photographing these beauties for an exhibition catalog.

 

American Pie, 2002

And before I say what I’m going to say next, here’s a disclaimer. Milton’s work is all about black culture, community, and struggle and I have no clue what it’s like to be one of my black brothers or sisters. However, through these works I gained a deep, guttural, penetrating understanding of how utterly crooked and cruel the world can be and a nagging and hounding that I had to be a part of righting the wrongs in the world. And at that moment I knew I had to use  art to do it.

Of course it was a combination of so many small events like this one that lit a fire under me, but this one is vividly distinctive. So thank you, Uncle Cory, for sharing Milton’s artwork with me. It changed my life. Although my methods have transformed over the last twenty years, every time I sit down to paint, I think about this question, “Does it bring goodness into the world?” And now I’m not only a painter, but a curator. This allows me to apply this question on a larger scale. Are our exhibitions virtuous? Do they do good and not harm? Do they help people see what is true, to see the world as it is, in all of its ugliness and to refuse to stop there, but to fight the uphill battle of giving a damn, of holding onto hope and getting off one’s ass to do something about the ugliness?

To learn more about Milton Bowens please read this fantastic article: https://ubomag.wordpress.com/2013/07/27/miltonbowens.

What work or artist inspired you to create? Which pieces challenge you to make a difference? Please share your story with us!

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miltonbowen

Redoute- Painter of Flora

Cultivate

Botanicals have captivated  people all over the world with their beauty.  Floral patterns surround us daily in nature, landscapes, boutiques, decor, fashion, art, and fragrance. But why do we admire them so much?

I think that we love them for their beauty, their meaning, their healing powers, their fragrant and delightful aromas, their uncanny ability to make us smile.

Some see them as a reminder of our humanity. Like us, they are fed by the sun, by the rain, by the soil. They bloom into unique beauties and then they wither and eventually die. We are more alike than one might suppose. What makes our life meaningful is the inevitability of death. We shine for a time and then our earthly life passes. We enjoy flowers in a similar manner. We know we only have them for a short time, but while we have them we do our best to…

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Redoute- Painter of Flora

Botanicals have captivated  people all over the world with their beauty.  Floral patterns surround us daily in nature, landscapes, boutiques, decor, fashion, art, and fragrance. But why do we admire them so much?

I think that we love them for their beauty, their meaning, their healing powers, their fragrant and delightful aromas, their uncanny ability to make us smile.

Some see them as a reminder of our humanity. Like us, they are fed by the sun, by the rain, by the soil. They bloom into unique beauties and then they wither and eventually die. We are more alike than one might suppose. What makes our life meaningful is the inevitability of death. We shine for a time and then our earthly life passes. We enjoy flowers in a similar manner. We know we only have them for a short time, but while we have them we do our best to enjoy them.

There are some really amazing artists that do botanicals well, but perhaps the most enduring and significant floral painter of was Pierre-Joseph Redoute, an 18th-century French painter. He truly understood the nature and beauty of the botanical world but even more than that, he was able to communicate this with incredible skill and sensitivity.

Redoute was born in the Belgian Ardennes. He began his career intent on creating religious paintings and portraits, but this all changed when he fell in love with floral painting instead.  His interest in florals began when studying the work of the earlier Flemish and Dutch still-life artists. Later “… he studied botany with the noted naturalist Charles-Louis L’Heritier de Brutelle and learned the technique of painting in watercolor on vellum from Gerard van Spaendonck, Flower Painter to the King.” Some of his most recognizable work can be found in the botanical books that he illustrated. These works have influenced many artists since their first printing and will continue to influence artists in the future. Here are just a few.

Quote and biographical info found on https://www.kimbellart.org/exhibition/floral-art-pierre-joseph-redout

 

By Pierre-Joseph Redoute

I hope this blog post whets your appetite for our up-and-coming Botanicals exhibition. We will be featuring the botanical works of  several Waco artists, including local floral artists. There will be great shopping, music, and refreshments. It’s going to be an amazing exhibition!

Please join us for our Grand-Opening Exhibition and Party.

The Botanicals Exhibition

December 1st at 6 pm Cultivate 7Twelve

712 Austin Ave Waco TX

#cultivateblog #rhiannoncreates #cultivate7twelve  #wacoartsdistrict #downtownwaco

Feminine Forms

pinkandblu_nudeLast Friday Cultivate launched a beautiful exhibition (if I do say so myself)—Feminine Forms.

My favorite part about this exhibition would have to be the variety of female forms, young and old, clothed and nude small, and large, a true celebration of womanly forms. However, my favorite pieces were those that were drawn from live models. I love to pour over the works of those who have a keen sensibility and understanding of the human figure. I think that the figure as represented in art is so compelling as a topic because of its enduring appeal to art lovers throughout time.

Although the human figure has been represented in art work since the Prehistoric era in sculptures and then later in paintings, it wasn’t until the Renaissance that Figure drawing came into its own and changed the level of sophistication in art work all together. With the Renaissance came advancements in drawing such as perspective and anatomical knowledge and thus a love of figure drawing was born.
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It amazes me that so much can be expressed with so few marks on a page. For example, this Charles Wallis painting, which is part of our current exhibition.
Wallace_3Nude Figure #3 By Charles Wallis

Figure and Gesture drawing, when done well, gives us so much more than anatomy. An artist can capture the attitude, the mental state, and even the action of a figure with only a few scant tools. And that’s why those artists that can do this well are quite amazing.

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Figure Drawing By James Jean

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The​ ​Quotidian By Katie Ward

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Figure Drawing By Henry Yan

Joel Tidey gesture

Gesture By Joel Tidey

I hope this post gives you a better appreciation of figure drawing. And please come into the gallery and feast your eyes upon all of the pieces in this amazing exhibition. Feminine Forms will be up all of November.

Cheers!

 

Curated by Rhiannon Rosenbaum

Hello, my name is Rhiannon Rosenbaum and I’m a Fine Artist, curator and exhibition manager living in Waco Texas. This blog exists as a format to talk all things Art, Design and Community. Enjoy!